Looking in holes for rattlers!

DSC_0094Yes, my idea of fun is squishing around a wetland looking for venomous snakes! But, where to even look? Well, “I know a guy.” Dr. Steve Main, a retired colleague from Wartburg College, spends time at Lakeside Lab every summer. We’ve enjoyed many chats about Iowa nature (and wetlands!), and he invited to host me when I visited Bremer County. Turns out, he showed me around two different wetlands, and he and his wife were kind enough to put me up for the night and feed me, too. I had a great visit!

DSC_0071Full disclosure: I seem to be the “Anti-Dr. Doolittle.” I should have warned Steve before the visit: people taking me out to view nature all too often mention that on similar trips—without me present—they find the (bird/blooming flower/butterfly/whatever), but with me present…no luck. Such it was with the “Swamp Rattler,” the Massassauga Rattlesnake (Sistrurus catenatus) at a site near the Wapsie River. Such a wetland has a soggy meadow dotted with “mud volcanoes” made by crayfish (crawfish? crawdads? I’m ecumenical regarding Crustacean names). These holes in the ground lead to a tunnel suitable for overwintering by the snakes. And those (imperiled) snakes are found in these wetlands.

This isn’t the big, noisy rattlesnake sunning on a rock, familiar from Western movies. It’s likely to be in dense vegetation, and hard to see. And unfortunately, there aren’t too many to see—they are endangered in Iowa. It causes quite the excitement when seen.

DSC_0088No worries, we still saw plenty of wetland beauty: an excellent population of Pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata), various Bulrush, Smartweeds, water-lily, Dock, and more. And really, wetland conservation is a package deal: protecting and managing habitat for a snake also benefits the other reptiles, and amphibians, and birds and insects…you get the idea.

Steve generously took additional time and showed me a large nearby DNR wetland complex, Sweet Marsh. We enjoyed the birds, butterflies, and frogs. But I was especially excited to see my beloved tall wetland plants. A healthy stand of Common (Broad-leaved) Cattail, Typha latifolia. We so often see the narrow-leaved species (T. angustifolia) or the hybrid between them (T. x glauca). Even more exciting was a stand of Wild Rice (Zizania sp.)! Despite the various waters named “Rice Lake” you may know, I don’t see it growing in the wild in Iowa too often. I’ll be sure to discuss this when I teach Ethnobotany next semester. I was also pleased to pass this along to some practitioners of traditional plant uses. (Wetland networking at its finest!)

What a great time I had exploring these wetlands, talking shop with a colleague and friend, and celebrating these special places. And now, you’ve joined the fun. Please join me on my remaining wetland adventures, won’t you?DSC_0109

Author: Paul Weihe

Associate Professor of Biology at Central College, traditional author (Textbook of Limnology, Cole & Weihe, 5th ed.; Waveland Press), and now...blogger!

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